PARIPURNA
DIVISI 62
May 11, 2018 - June 10, 2018

RUCI Art Space presents PARIPURNA by DIVISI 62. Curated by Gesyada Siregar. Can we really define what is ‘Indonesian’? The exhibition poses this question by presenting the works of @divisi62, a Jakarta-based group of individuals with backgrounds in music studies, anthropology, film, graphic design and photography.

In an era of globalization and mass reproduced culture, the lines between global and local are blurred. What is the relationship between “traditional” versus “modern” Indonesia? What does it mean for the modern Indonesian who are regularly exposed to and have academically studied Western concepts and ideas? As an exhibition, PARIPURNA examine these questions through the lens of the “modern Indonesian,” of the “Westernized Indonesian” returned. This pendulum-like tension is presented as an artistic stance in the form of a collective exhibition, displaying objects of interventions.

In their debut exhibition as a collective, DIVISI 62 intends to establish a dialogue of seeing the paripurna -- whole -- view of our ‘Indonesian’ identity and how to assess the aesthetics and ideological concept of “Indonesia” without any preconception. By re-locating and weaving the scattered fragments of our heritage, we can move closer to reach and reclaim the pieces that we have been detached from.

(Open for Public)
Friday, 11 May 2018
7 PM – 12 AM

Exhibition Period
(Open for Public)
12 May 2018 – 10 June 2018
Mon – Sun | 11 AM – 7 PM

Ruci Art Space
Jalan Suryo #49
021-72799802
info@ruciart.com
Artist

 

Can we really define what is ‘Indonesian’? The exhibition poses this question by presenting the works of DIVISI 62, a Jakarta-based group of individuals with backgrounds in music studies, anthropology, film, graphic design and photography.

 

In an era of globalization and mass reproduced culture, the lines between global and local are blurred. What is the relationship between “traditional” versus “modern” Indonesia? What does it mean for the modern Indonesian who are regularly exposed to and have academically studied Western concepts and ideas? As an exhibition, PARIPURNA examine these questions through the lens of the “modern Indonesian,” of the “Westernized Indonesian” returned. This pendulum-like tension is presented as an artistic stance in the form of a collective exhibition, displaying objects of interventions.

 

What is ‘Indonesian art’? The arrival of Western disciplines and techniques have always challenged Indonesian artists to answer that question. In 1948, an infamous debate incurred between J. Hopman, a Dutch art critic, and S. Sudjojono, the Indonesian painter. Hopman wrote that “Indonesian” paintings did not yet exist, because they used Western principles. Sudjojono, infamously known as the Father of Indonesian Modern Fine Arts, defended his fellow painters, responding in an article titled We Know How to Lead Indonesian Art (1948). He stated that, despite the use of Western painting techniques, the “-isms” of art were not exclusive to the West — that Indonesia too had its own legitimate artistic ideologies and techniques. However, the direction in which Sudjojono or his friends wanted to lead Indonesian arts remained open-ended. We are still left wondering what exactly is “Indonesian” art?

 

DIVISI 62 recognizes that art can simultaneously exist within and beyond the defined categories of ‘East’ and ‘West’. Innovations imported from outside may permeate into Indonesia, but often are used beyond its original playbook. Therefore, reinterpretations by Indonesian artists can often exist outside the boundaries of Western conventions. This approach has always sparked debates, a current issue that is present in this PARIPURNA exhibition – which rings the same urgency as the exhibition that J.Hopman criticized.

 

Sudjojono gave optimistic clues on how to determine the future of Indonesian arts. One thing he mentioned was that it is sensible to study the history and principles of the West, for it can help identify the place of what is often considered as ‘primitive’ arts within Western principles. Through this method, we will discover how Eastern – specifically Indonesian – and Western artistic principles differ and how they are similar. PARIPURNA aims to apply Sudjojono’s principle to study and retrace ‘Indonesian-ness’.

 

It is natural to feel distant yet familiar when we experience the audiovisual presentation of DIVISI 62. The cultural elements that are presented – Barong, kecapi, old archives –  opens the possibility to be critical of its hybridity and authenticity. If we are able to view all cultural products as equal, we should seek to understand the value in ambiguity.

 

In their debut exhibition as a collective, DIVISI 62 intends to establish a dialogue of seeing the paripurna — whole — view of our ‘Indonesian’ identity and how to assess the aesthetics and ideological concept of “Indonesia” without any preconception. By re-locating and weaving the scattered fragments of our heritage, we can move closer to reach and reclaim the pieces that we have been detached from.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WALL TEXT

 

Can we really define what is ‘Indonesian’? The exhibition poses this question by presenting the works of DIVISI 62, a Jakarta-based group of individuals with backgrounds in music studies, anthropology, film, graphic design and photography.

 

In an era of globalization and mass reproduced culture, the lines between global and local are blurred. What is the relationship between “traditional” versus “modern” Indonesia? This pendulum-like tension is presented as an artistic stance in the form of a collective exhibition, displaying objects of interventions.

 

In their debut exhibition as a collective, DIVISI 62 intends to establish a dialogue of seeing the paripurna — whole — view of our ‘Indonesian’ identity and how to assess the aesthetics and ideological concept of “Indonesia” without any preconception. By re-locating and weaving the scattered fragments of our heritage, we can move closer to reach and reclaim the pieces that we have been detached from.

Press Release

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

 

PARIPURNA: DIVISI 62

 

Jakarta, 9th May 2018

 

 

RUCI Art Space presents PARIPURNA, an exhibition by DIVISI 62, a Jakarta-based group of individuals with backgrounds in music studies, anthropology, film, graphic design and photography that poses the question “Can we really define what is ‘Indonesian’?”. Curated by Gesyada Siregar, this exhibition serves as an attempt to unveil the ambiguity of our identity as Indonesians. The opening of the exhibition will be held on 11th May 2018 from 7 pm – 12 am. The exhibition will run until 10th June 2018 daily from 11 am – 7 pm.

 

Being Indonesians, who are unintentionally obscured to their heritage, DIVISI 62 iterates western influence in the context of Indonesian culture. As an exhibition, PARIPURNA examines the viewpoints of individuals who are distant from their tradition. Having academically studied and accessed the Western inventions, DIVISI 62 aims to re-appropriate themselves into their Indonesian heritage that is ironically distant. This pendulum-like tension is presented as an artistic stance in the form of a collective exhibition, displaying objects of interventions. It is sensible to study the history and principles of the West, for it can help identify the place of what is often considered as ‘primitive’ arts within western principles. Through this method, we will discover that the East – particularly Indonesia – and the West does cross paths. This realization enables DIVISI 62 to study and retrace ‘Indonesian-ness’.

 

It is inevitable to notice Barong, kecapi, rebab, old archives and traditional dances – when we experience the audiovisual presentation of DIVISI 62, with their choices of the mediums presented here — video, photography, archives, illustrations, and sound art.  On the contrary, the audience might be critical in acknowledging that these cultural products are also a hybrid of other cultures. It is not surprising to recognize the evident Indonesian elements that are present if we think of all cultural products as equal. These chosen aspects have been narrowed down in accordance to both their objectivity and subjectivity.

 

In their debut as a collective, DIVISI 62 brings to the surface the statement of that the way you can see the exhibition as a view of our Indonesian identity is by using objectivity, taking distance or bird eye view. After seeing the whole, we can later zoom in to reach and reclaim the piece that we need and supposed to be connected with us.

RUCI’s participation in the art community is to amplify and nurture the rising awareness of art in Indonesia’s evolving diverse culture. RUCI aims to serve as a bridge between artists and public by providing a space to experiment, develop, and transform ideas into representative symbols and objects. By realizing its objections, RUCI participates by playing the role as a medium to our cultural identity that represents today’s generation.